2019 Women’s March: The #WomensWave is coming!

Needa Bee (left), is a resident and activist of a homeless encampment of women and children that was destroyed by the city of Oakland. She decries the city’s treatment of its homeless population.
“While the children were at school, while half of the residents were at their job, they came in and swarmed us. They did not allow us to pack … they didn’t allow supporters in to help us pack.”
On an Indybay video, Bee gave a scathing critique of the city’s mayor. She then turned to face police, yelling that she hoped none of them lose their home, that “Jesus’ birthday is coming up,” noting that Christ himself was homeless.
PHOTO/SANDHYA DIRKS, KQED NEWS

 

On these pages the People’s Tribune continues its monthly coverage of the many women leaders who are fighting in the interests of us all, for a society that cares for everyone. Call (800) 691-6888 or e-mail info@peoplestribune.org and we’ll send you copies of the paper to get out at the Women’s March. Also, please send photos and stories of your city’s march!

“It’s time to march again! On January 19, 2019, we’re going to flood the streets of Washington, D.C., and cities across the globe. The #WomensWave is coming, and we’re sweeping the world forward with us,” say march organizers. Women are at the “front of the resistance to the government, fighting to stop the assaults on our rights,” protesting “family separation actions at the U.S. border” and the “nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court,” among other efforts, organizers say.

The women’s marches, beginning with the first in 2017, have seen millions of participants fighting for women’s rights—and more. Signs illustrating participants’ urgent demands for healthcare for all, for an end to deportations and family separation at the border, for clean, affordable water and a safe environment, against gun violence and police killings, are in every march. Women are leading the fight for a society that represents us all.

 

“Our desperation turned into determination, and we took matters into our own hands by leading a historic nine-day statewide strike. The solidarity that made this strike possible was not built along party lines … We had a common goal: to win a material gain that we deserved in order to make our lives better as workers … Democrats in our state legislature sided with public employees during our fight for a raise and healthcare funding, but they didn’t come to our rescue. We exerted pressure and they responded quickly. Republicans stood in staunch opposition to us until the bitter end … However, if workers had not led the charge, we may have never heard a sound from Democratic lawmakers about the need for these measures … we can’t wait on politicians to save us. We must lead the fight and take our demands straight to those in power. [Excerpts from “55 Strong: Inside the West Virginia Teachers’ Strike”] —Emily Comer, South Charleston High School, Kanawha County, West Virginia

“We live in a country that has unfortunately built its foundation on who is inferior or superior. This bill [to raise the minimum wage and for paid sick leave] challenges the idea of who is deserving and what do they deserve. Make sure that this bill is not gutted. Make sure Michigan sets a precedent for the rest of the country.” — Patrisse Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, speaking in Michigan in October about why Black Lives Matter supports the One Fair Wage Campaign to raise the minimum wage, particularly of restaurant workers. Editor’s note: Dirty steps taken by Michigan lawmakers ensured the bill was not on the ballot. Now, citing “burdens for employers, the outgoing lawmakers are further scaling back grassroots demands.
PHOTO/BRETT JELINEK, OLAFIMAGES.COM

“We live in a country that has unfortunately built its foundation on who is inferior or superior. This bill [to raise the minimum wage and for paid sick leave] challenges the idea of who is deserving and what do they deserve. Make sure that this bill is not gutted. Make sure Michigan sets a precedent for the rest of the country.” — Patrisse Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, speaking in Michigan in October about why Black Lives Matter supports the One Fair Wage Campaign to raise the minimum wage, particularly of restaurant workers. Editor’s note: Dirty steps taken by Michigan lawmakers ensured the bill was not on the ballot. Now, citing “burdens for employers, the outgoing lawmakers are further scaling back grassroots demands.
PHOTO/BRETT JELINEK, OLAFIMAGES.COM

A diverse group of women (some pictured above) ended ICE detention in the City of Atlanta; the city no longer holds detainees on behalf of ICE. Contributors to the report, “Inside Atlanta’s Immigrant Cages,” which documented the inhumane conditions at an Atlanta detention center, told Colorlines that “Atlanta has been profiting off the imprisonment of immigrants … while touting that it’s a ‘welcoming city’ for immigrants.” After the Mayor (above right) signed the executive order, a woman who participated in the victory tweeted, “One down, three more immigration detention centers in Georgia to go! Here’s to shutting them all down!” [broadly.vice.com]
PHOTO/VICE.COM

 

School under attack by state-sponsored Emergency Managers

 

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